The White House is Coming HERE for a Christmas Tree

This year’s White House Christmas tree will be selected from a tree farm in Sweet Home, Oregon.

It will travel across the country and be on display in Blue River at the McKenzie Track and Field on November 11th from 10:30 am – 11:30 am. Ornaments can be purchased online to travel with the tree and be hung when it arrives at the White House. The unveiling of the tree of the year is a media event. Here is last year’s tree.


Posted on October 15, 2018 at 2:41 pm
Nadine Scott | Posted in Events |

The 7 Most Common Home Insurance Claims That Make Premiums Spike—and How to Avoid Them

by Jamie Wiebb | Realtor.com

To many homeowners, home insurance is just another bill to pay. But when disasters happen, this extra layer of protection can serve as your lifeboat—and simultaneously, your worst nightmare.

That’s because each home insurance claim, while offering financial relief in the short term, can increase the amount you pay for your premium—sometimes dramatically. So what’s a budget-conscious homeowner to do? First, you should know the most common home insurance claims—and how to avoid having to file one in the first place.

To be clear, we’re not saying you shouldn’t file a home insurance claim when you’ve suffered loss or damage—that’s what insurance is for, and you’re paying for it. But certain types of damage can be prevented or minimized, and it’s in your financial best interest to take the proactive route.

So make sure you understand how your insurance works—and how to prepare for the inevitable—because you could save yourself some major bucks.

1. Bad weather

Ask 10 home insurance agents about their most-encountered claims, and all of them will list weather near the top: Tornadoes cause tremendous structural damage. Lightning can fry your electronics—or set your house on fire.

And hail? Insurance agents hate hail. For good reason: A single hailstorm might force your insurance to pay for a new roof, siding, windows, and more.

“Hail is a rough thing on insurance because it hits entire neighborhoods,” says Bob Buckel, a vice president and product manager at Erie Insurance. “And there’s not a lot you can do to prevent hail losses.”

How to prevent it: Properly maintaining your roof and siding won’t prevent a hailstorm, but it can lessen the damage when one happens—and thus decrease the insurance payout.

2. Plumbing failures

Water damage is another common insurance claim—and most of the destruction isn’t caused by rain.

“Most of the time [water damage] means a failure of a plumbing system in your home,” Buckel says. An average 2.5-bathroom home has 13 faucets or water sources, he adds—”and each one is susceptible to breaking.”

How to prevent it: You’ll need to do a little regular upkeep. Are there any leaky faucets or curious puddles on the floor? Check them out, and fix any associated problems. Immediately.

“Sometimes, everything is done properly during installation, but the homeowner neglects routine maintenance such as inspecting and repairing grout and caulk, removing clumps of hair from a shower drain, or checking and replacing water supply lines for appliances,” says Scott Congiusti, the assistant vice president of claims for HUB International.

But plumbing problems plague perfectly maintained homes, too.

“A clogged toilet, sink left running, and an overloaded washing machine can all be easily prevented, but it is not always easy with guests, small children, or domestic staff present in the household,” Congiusti says. “You can minimize, but never eliminate, human error.”

3. Fires

In terms of stress and expense, a house fire is, perhaps unsurprisingly, one of the worst home insurance claims. Unlike hail or wind damage, it’s not simply a matter of replacing roof or siding. Often it means moving out, living temporarily in a rental, and rebuilding a room—or even the whole house.

“The colder the winter, the more fires we see,” Buckel says. “People start supplementing their heating with a wood-burning stove, and we see a lot of claims coming out of those.”

How to prevent it: To avoid a house fire (and the associated damage), have your chimney inspected and regularly cleaned, and be alert for any fire risks around the home, such as space heaters or overloaded extension cords.

4. Washer hoses

It’s easy to forget about these hoses tucked behind your washing machine, but poor maintenance could lead to an expensive insurance claim—especially if your washer and dryer aren’t located in a basement.

“Washer hoses breaking in the basement is one thing, because there’s usually a drain there,” Buckel says. “But imagine one breaking in the second-floor laundry room.”

This dramatic failure could lead to what Buckel calls “significant claims”: up to six-figure losses.

How to prevent it: Regularly check and replace your hoses (at least every five years) to keep your washer from flooding the house.

5. Flooding

While your home insurance should cover any home-related water damage from plumbing leaks, flooding caused by external forces —like an overflowing river—is typically not included in your regular home insurance plan.

“It’s a nationwide problem,” Buckel says.

Indeed: In 2016, only 12% of American homeowners had flood insurance.

“People think, ‘Oh well, I have to live in a flood zone to get flood insurance,'” Buckel says. “But 25% of all flood claims come from properties outside of a flood zone.”

How to prevent it: If there are any major bodies of water nearby—even if your home doesn’t technically fall in a flood zone (check here)—consider speaking with an agent. It’s better to be covered in case of disaster than to lose everything.

6. Service line breakages

You might not spend a lot of time thinking about your service lines—those large, in-ground pipes that swoop away your sewage and supply must-haves like water and gas—but if one breaks, you won’t be able to think of anything else. And these guys are surprisingly fragile: All you need is one rogue tree root breaking through the piping to screw up your month.

Many insurance companies won’t cover that unless you have a specific endorsement (an addition to your contract expanding the scope of coverage), Buckel says. “And these problems are expensive. You often have to dig up the line and then replace it. That claim could be more than $6,000.”

How to prevent it: Get regular sewer scopes to ensure the line stays clean, and pay attention to any water seepage in your yard that could indicate a problem with your water lines. Talk to your insurance agent to make sure you’re covered in case your lines go haywire. Otherwise, you could be in for a huge financial surprise.

7. Personal liabilities

Ever heard the one about someone tripping on a home’s walkway and then suing the owners for all they’re worth? These kinds of claims are surprisingly common, experts say. And while your insurance might cover the cost of the lawsuit, a single personal liability claim can increase your premiums for years.

“A family friend of 20-plus years that slips on an icy walkway can turn into years of torment, all because of the myth that, ‘It’s not you I’m suing, it’s the insurance company,'” Congiusti says. “Well, when it’s time to renew a homeowners policy, you may not feel that way when a large claim payment limits your choices.”

How to prevent it: Sidewalks contribute to a lot of these injury claims—as do trampolines and pools. Pay careful attention whenever your pool or trampoline are in use, and make sure sidewalks are clear and any tripping hazards around the home have been removed.


Posted on October 9, 2018 at 1:34 pm
Nadine Scott | Posted in Real Estate |

Belknap Springs + lots of other fun in the area

See the source image

Belknap Hot Springs is good reason for a day trip from Eugene, but are you aware of other attractions in the general vicinity that are also possibly of interest? Belknap’s website lists these as additional reasons to visit:

  • Sightseeing: Visit nearby lava beds at the base of the Three Sisters Mountains, waterfalls, mountain vistas, etc.
    Biking: Many trails are good for mountain biking, including the 26 mile McKenzie River Trail.
    Hiking: Myriads of trails nearby and in the high country, from nature trails to wilderness challenges.
    • Golf at the famous Tokatee Golf Club just 8 miles away — one of the highest rated public golf courses in the country.
    • Deer and Elk hunting in season.
    • Enjoy beautiful autumn foliage!
    • Unique shopping at Christmas Treasures.
    Skiing at Hoodoo Ski Bowl just 30 miles away plus many cross country ski trails.
    • Hiking and Biking the lower trails all winter, including the McKenzie River Trail.
    Fishing in the lower river, the lakes and reservoirs year round.

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Posted on September 28, 2018 at 4:01 pm
Nadine Scott | Posted in Explore the McKenzie |

McKenzie River Home Design Ideas

by Houzz

Find inspiration for your home on the McKenzie River either through style concepts or to remodel your existing riverfront home. This is a sample of attractive designs you might enjoy from houzz.com.

 

Deck - contemporary deck idea in Other

 

Deck – contemporary deck idea in Other
Cable Railing Example. Would like the wood finish to match the awing. – ambercpa

Example of a trendy wooden u-shaped open staircase design in Other

 

Example of a trendy wooden u-shaped open staircase design in Other
Lower divide could be used in loft. – pethle

Deck - contemporary deck idea in Other

 

Deck – contemporary deck idea in Other
Cable Railing Example. Would like the wood finish to match the awing. – ambercpa

Example of a trendy wooden u-shaped open staircase design in Other

 

Example of a trendy wooden u-shaped open staircase design in Other
Lower divide could be used in loft. – pethle

 
Award-winning Architect and AIA/Fellow in Eugene, OR
 
Sponsored

This house and guest house design fits the rolling Hill Country site it commands along the Blanco River in Texas. The somewhat triangular shape of the site grows wider towards the limestone-based river that arcs through the hills. Every space in the house naturally wanted a view of the river and the forest hills beyond. To achieve this, the house arcs to fit the site, expanding the view and personalizing each space’s relationship to the water and woods, as each view is slightly different. Materials and colors in the house reflect the site: limestone, olive (which matches the water!) stained concrete floors, wood of reminiscent of the woods, and the complementary silvery permanence of galvanized steel. The 3-layered complex (rendered in stone+metal+glass) is approached downhill from the west through a break in a limestone wall between the main house and the guest house. Upon crossing this threshold, visitors are drawn into the mutually compatible relationship between building and site,

Example of a trendy two-story mixed siding exterior home design in Other

 

Example of a trendy two-story mixed siding exterior home design in Other
Example of ramp to entrance….no stairs. – krichter3320

Inspiration for a large contemporary l-shaped slate floor eat-in kitchen remodel in Other with an undermount sink, flat-panel cabinets, medium tone wood cabinets, granite countertops, multicolored backsplash, stainless steel appliances and an island

 

Adam Pitchie
Inspiration for a large contemporary l-shaped slate floor eat-in kitchen remodel in Other with an undermount sink, flat-panel cabinets, medium tone wood cabinets, granite countertops, multicolored backsplash, stainless steel appliances and an island

Example of a large trendy master multicolored tile slate floor bathroom design in Other with an undermount sink, granite countertops, a two-piece toilet and gray walls

 

Adam Pitchie
Example of a large trendy master multicolored tile slate floor bathroom design in Other with an undermount sink, granite countertops, a two-piece toilet and gray walls
i like the tile back splash. Are the counters granite? – photocooperk14

Eugene’s Full-Service Residential Architect
 
Example of a large trendy l-shaped slate floor eat-in kitchen design in Other with an undermount sink, raised-panel cabinets, medium tone wood cabinets, granite countertops, multicolored backsplash, stainless steel appliances and an island
 

Adam Pitchie
Example of a large trendy l-shaped slate floor eat-in kitchen design in Other with an undermount sink, raised-panel cabinets, medium tone wood cabinets, granite countertops, multicolored backsplash, stainless steel appliances and an island
Windows! In the kitchen – gggal


Posted on September 24, 2018 at 11:43 am
Nadine Scott | Posted in Move to a Place that Moves You |

Ready for a Mushroom Gathering Adventure?

Information gathered from Willamette National Forest Service website

Personal (Incidental/Non-Commercial) Use

No permit or fee is required for quantities less than one gallon (per person, per day) unless you are collecting matsutakes.

black and brown mushroom beside grass

If collecting more than a gallon – even if only for personal use – a permit is required. Obtain the permit from the office closest to where you plan to harvest: See ranger station locations here.
Mushrooms gathered under incidental harvest are for personal use only and all mushrooms collected must be cut in half. Selling or exchanging mushrooms gathered incidentally is a violation of Federal Regulations (Title 36 CFR 261.6F), punishable by a fine of not more than $5,000 or imprisonment for not more than 6 months, or both.

A mushroom permit issued from any of the following four forests is valid on all four forests.

  • Deschutes National Forest
  • Fremont-Winema National Forests
  • Umpqua National Forest
  • Willamette National Forest

Commercial Use

Mushrooms collected for the purpose of selling require the purchase of a commercial use permit. Commercial permits (for mushrooms other than matsutakes) are available throughout the year. Permits can be purchased using cash, check or credit card.

The 2017 Matsutake Season opens September 5 and runs through November 5, 2017. Anyone harvesting Matsutake mushrooms on National Forest land must purchase a commercial harvest permit. Click here for details

Mushroom Etiquette

  • Tread lightly while searching for mushrooms
  • Replace soil disturbed while collecting
  • No raking or digging with shovels
  • Collect mushrooms only in permissible area
  • Harvesting mushrooms is not permitted in the following designated sensitive areas: Wilderness areas, botanical areas, scenic areas, and research areas.

WARNING: Many edible mushrooms have poisonous look-a-likes. Be certain of what you’re picking before consuming.

Details on forest products permits and regulations

 


Posted on September 12, 2018 at 3:33 pm
Nadine Scott | Posted in Explore the McKenzie |

Paradise Campground has a lot to Offer

by US Forest Service

photo by Paul Allen

Overview

Paradise Campground is indeed a paradise for campers. Tucked within a lush, old-growth forest of Douglas fir and western red cedar, the area portrays a sub-tropical vibe along the banks of the McKenzie River, where catch-and-release trout and steelhead fishing is a popular activity, along with whitewater rafting and kayaking.

Natural Features:

Paradise sits on a bend of the river at an elevation of 1,600 feet. Ferns and other moisture loving plants cover the ground, and mosses drape the trees. The campground is in the heart of Willamette National Forest, which spans 1.6 million acres on the western slopes of the Cascade Range.

Recreation:

Rafters and kayakers live it up in the whitewater of the McKenzie River. A boat ramp is located on-site.

The McKenzie River National Recreation Trail begins nearby, and is a favorite among hikers and mountain bikers.

Facilities:

A number of sites face the river, while many others are tucked into the scenic forest. Flush toilets are dispersed throughout the campground and parking spurs are paved. Educational programs are provided at the amphitheater.

Nearby Attractions:

A golf course is located about 7 miles west of the campground.

Activities and Amenities

Within Facility
  • Amphitheater
  • Biking
  • Boat Ramp
  • Campfire Rings
  • Drinking Water
  • Fishing
  • Flush Toilets
  • Hiking
  • Host
  • Kayaking
  • Picnic Area
  • River Access
  • Vault Toilets
  • Whitewater Rafting
Know Before You Go
  • Be bear aware; keep all food out of sight in approved containers or locked inside your vehicle and remove all food from the area after eating
  • No electric hookups at this facility
  • This campground has first-come, first-served sites
  • A fee will be charged for additional vehicles
  • No firearms, fireworks or chainsaws allowed
  • For more information on Willamette National Forest, click here
  • Don’t Move Firewood: Please protect Pacific Northwest forests by preventing the spread of invasive species. Firewood can carry insects and diseases that can threaten the health of our western forests. You can make a difference by obtaining and burning your firewood near your camping destination. Visit Dontmovefirewood.org for further information.

Getting There:

GPS Info. (Latitude, Longitude):
44.18611, -122.09611
44°11’10″N, 122°5’46″W

From Eugene, Oregon, take I-105 east to McKenzie Highway 126 and drive 55 miles to McKenzie Bridge. The campground is located on the left side of Highway, 5 miles beyond McKenzie Bridge.

Contact Information:

Mailing Address:

PARADISE IN OREGON

Blue River  OR

Phone Number:

Information:  (801)226-3564


Posted on September 5, 2018 at 11:27 am
Nadine Scott | Posted in Explore the McKenzie |

Despite Fire, McKenzie Area Still Very Much Open for Recreation (mostly)

 

 

It is still a great time to visit the McKenzie River Recreation area, despite the unfortunate wild fire at Cougar. What you should know, though, is that many sections of the McKenzie are unaffected by the blaze, and there is plenty of McKenzie River Trail accessible to the west of Trail Bridge Campground and to the east of Carmen Reservoir. Cougar Reservoir and Blue River Reservoir are available.

 

Businesses remain open, and there are rivers, lakes, biking trails and hiking trails still open and available in most areas.

 

The light rain has helped to calm the fire down, but it did not get rid of burning under cliff overhangs and within trees and roots.

 

If you attempt to visit Blue Pool you are likely to encounter law enforcement and a citation up to $280, as they are working hard to make the area safe again. Once hazards are removed and the fire is completely contained, work will begin to make the area safe and accessible. 

 

Just remember you have options, and there is plenty of adventure to be had on the McKenzie. For more information, call the McKenzie Ranger Station at 541-822-3381 or visit fs.usda.gov/alerts/willamette/alerts-notices.

 


Posted on August 24, 2018 at 3:02 pm
Nadine Scott | Posted in Explore the McKenzie |

Protecting our Drinking Water

Source:  EWEB Website

The McKenzie River is the sole source of drinking water for nearly 200,000 people in the Eugene metropolitan area. We have a number of utility and customer programs aimed at protecting this valuable resource.

 

 

When you turn on your tap, you expect the water to be pure, healthy and tasty.  That is why we work hard to deliver water that meets or exceeds all state and federal health standards. In fact, we are proud to say we have never violated any Environmental Protection Agency water quality standard. Public health is our highest priority.  We care about the health of the families that drink our water and we want to help limit your exposure to lead in drinking water.  The main source of lead in water in the Eugene area is old household plumbing. Lead solder was commonly used in homes built or plumbed with copper pipes before 1986.  Lead also can be found in brass faucets and fixtures installed prior to 2014.

 

 

A few things to know about your water’s reliability

Limited supply: EWEB has enough storage to provide only one or two days of drinking water if something happens to our McKenzie River source.

Community risk: A reliable supply of clean water is vital to public health, safety and our economy, especially in an emergency.

System resilience: EWEB’s strategy to replace and renew our water system will increase resilience now, and for future generations.

Affordable: Careful planning will balance water reliability and affordability, which are both important community values.


Posted on August 16, 2018 at 9:46 am
Nadine Scott | Posted in Explore the McKenzie |

17K in a Day – Calling Advanced Riders

  • Dates:
    8/11/2018, 9/8/2018
  • Location:
    Oregon Adventures
  • Address:
    47929 Hwy 58, Oakridge, OR 97463
  • Phone:
    541.968.5397
  • Time:
    8:00 AM to 5:30 PM
  • Price:
    $185
The 17K in a Day mountain bike ride will give you vertical footage of at least the length a five-kilometer run. 17K is now over 18K with the addition of new singletrack at the top of the Dead Mountain Trail. Unparalleled views and thigh burn await the intrepid riders who are willing to take on 45 steep miles of singletrack paradise in the Mountain Biking Capital of the Northwest. This all day tour covers six trails including the Alpine Trail, Lawler and Hardesty Trails, Larison Rick, Dead Mountain Trail, Flat Creek Trail and Aubrey Mountain Trail. Tickets include lunch, a free shirt, several shuttles and professional guides.

This ride is for advanced riders only. Be prepared for 18,000 feet of descent, 4,000 feet of climbing and 45 miles of riding total.


Posted on August 13, 2018 at 10:34 am
Nadine Scott | Posted in Move to a Place that Moves You |

The Rolls-Royce of Mountain Bikes

Postcast and article by Noah Kagan | okdork.com

Yeti Cycles shouldn’t be around today.

Years ago, they were almost bankrupt — but today, they’re the Rolls-Royce of mountain bikes. 🚵

Their bikes have won best mountain bike of the year, professional competitions, and they built a brand that people LOVE.

Plus, their results are impressive. They’ve grown revenue 30% every year for five years in a row!

I wanted to know how they did it, so I invited Chris Conry, the co-founder of Yeti Cycles, to share his story.

You’ll learn:

  1. How to decide which products to create for your brand
  2. What Yeti does differently to recruit and hire the best team members who fit the brand
  3. How Yeti built a much-loved brand — and became the “Rolls-Royce” of mountain bikes

Things we talk about in this episode:


Posted on August 13, 2018 at 10:21 am
Nadine Scott | Posted in Explore the McKenzie |